June 1

Sarah Robertson

Goldfish Plant: What Kind of Plants Do Goldfish Like?

Every goldfish owner strives to give the finest care possible for their fish. While they are not as high-maintenance as saltwater fish, they do still benefit from having the appropriate plant in their aquarium. The good goldfish plant will give protection, a relaxing area to unwind, and help to remove waste and excess nutrients that can build up over time and harm your fish.

Plants may offer an intriguing underwater environment for goldfish tanks, but they must be chosen carefully. Goldfish are notorious for consuming anything and everything, including appealing plants. The best plants for goldfish are those that are hardy, safe for consumption, and can resist being uprooted by curious fish.

In fact, goldfish in aquariums with plants and gravel seem quite attractive. Live aquatic plants are beneficial to goldfish because they remove nitrate and carbon dioxide from the water, allowing for optimal oxygen levels. Live plants are also an excellent source of food for Goldfish.

Goldfish are also known to hide behind plants if they detect any danger, which is in line with their natural behavior. Goldfish like to sleep beside plants or decorations for the same reason it provides them a sense of security.

This article will give you an overview of the best plants for goldfish tanks and how to take care of them.

Challenges for keeping Plants in Goldfish Tank

Keeping aquatic plants in your goldfish tank might be difficult. Goldfish are notorious for eating almost all types of aquatic plants. If you still want to give it a try, keep the following things in mind:

Temperature

Goldfish need water temperatures of 68 to 74°F (20-23°C). It might be difficult to locate plants that will adapt to a cold water fish setting. Under these circumstances, tropical plants that require heaters may grow slowly and struggle a lot.

If you want to keep aquarium plants in your goldfish tank, check for ones that tolerate low water temperatures or even prefer them. The ideal goldfish plants are those that thrive in low temperatures and grow quickly. Because goldfish are prone to uproot and destroy live plants, fast recovery is ideal.

Goldfish Dig Up Plants

It's critical to plan ahead when it comes to plant placement. Goldfish have a terrible habit of destroying plants that need a substrate. Best to avoid all of these heavy-feeding root stimulators that need the media to develop.

If you want to grow plants in your aquarium, search for those that thrive while floating or like to root themselves on objects like driftwood. There are several types of aquarium plants that perform the same function.

High Nutrient Loads

Another thing to bear in mind is the high nutrient content of the water. Goldfish are huge, messy fish. They generate a lot of fish waste, which causes high amounts of nitrates in the water. Plants are beneficial in absorbing nutrients from the water, but some of them might develop uncontrollably.

When you're conducting your study, be sure to measure the full plant's size, how quickly it develops, and how well it will absorb nitrates. The better it can absorb nitrates from the aquarium water over a short period of time, the more effective it is.

Goldfish Will Eat Most Plants

In a planted tank, goldfish are nuisances. They are extremely harmful to sensitive plant species, especially those planted in the substrate. The ideal plants for goldfish aquariums are those that are resistant or unpalatable to these fish.

Some damage, if not too severe, can be tolerated by a resilient plant and still cause it to recover where a more sensitive one would simply die. If you can't discover a plant that your goldfish will leave alone, at the very least pick one that can withstand the damage and develop stronger as a result.

Many goldfish owners, as a result of their fish's behavior, opt to utilize fake aquarium plants.

What to Know Before Bringing New Aquatic Plants Home

Patience: It's not uncommon for plants to take some time to adjust to their new surroundings in your aquarium. While they get used to the new conditions, be patient. If your plants' leaves melt or don't grow for the first few weeks, this isn't uncommon.

Quarantine: Before adding any live thing to your tank, whether plant or animal, it must be quarantined. This will aid in the detection of diseases and insects before they are introduced to your main tank.

Rooting Tricks: There are two primary methods for attempting to outsmart your goldfish with live plants. One is picking plants that can be attached to surfaces with thread or aquarium-safe glue. The second is to choose plants that must be rooted and use plant weights to keep them in place. Plant weights are moldable, versatile pieces of metal that may be used to add weight below the substrate to keep your plants planted until they develop strong root systems.

Goldfish Plants

Goldfish Plants: Best Plants for Goldfish Tanks

Java Fern

Java fern is a slow to moderate-growing plant that's ideal for goldfish companions. This plant does not require a substrate. Its rhizomes will die if they are completely immersed in substrate, killing the plant. This implies you won't have to worry about keeping it planted.

Java fern prefers to be attached to surfaces, so your goldfish will find it much more difficult to pull out than planted plants since it is likely to attach itself to rocks and driftwood.

Because Java fern is not appealing to most fish, they will generally avoid it. It grows via rhizome splitting and plantlet development. If you have a Java fern that has dots all over the leaves and the leaves are dying, this indicates that new baby plants are growing. There are several different types of Java fern, each with its own distinctive leaf form. If you're seeking for the greatest goldfish plant options, the java fern is definitely one to consider.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: doesn't need to be planted in the substrate
  • Most fish won't eat it: your goldfish are unlikely to nibble on this plant
  • Can be glued or tied to surfaces: won't get uprooted as easily as other plants
  • Reproduces readily: you can propagate this plant by dividing the rhizome
  • Multiple varieties available: You can choose the leaf shape that you like best
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: can grow without additional CO2

Cons:

  • Slow to moderate growth rate: won't quickly cover up an empty tank
  • Needs to be attached to surfaces: won't provide many hiding places for fish
  • Will die if fully planted: keep this plant above the substrate

Water Sprite

The hardy water sprite is an excellent plant for goldfish tanks since it is virtually indestructible. It can be cultivated in a pot or grown in the water. It has huge root systems regardless of whether it is planted or floated. Because the water sprite may develop from a single leaf, if your goldfish try to eat it, numerous roots will sprout from all of the fragments.

The slow development rate, however, enables you to keep up with its advancement by pruning and demolishing damaged pieces that may root. It thrives in low light but will flourish with moderate to high lighting.

The leaves of the water sprite are small, delicate, and a lovely shade of vibrant green. In certain locations, Water sprite may be considered invasive, so don't let it escape into the natural environment even in tiny amounts.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: Can be floated or planted
  • Indestructible: Goldfish won't be able to damage this plant
  • Rapid growth rate: Quickly covers up an empty tank
  • Provides hiding places for fish: The roots offer plenty of places for fish to hide
  • Can be grown in low-light environments: Though it will do better with more light, it doesn't require high-light levels to survive
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: Can grow without additional CO2
  • Doesn’t require substrate: Can be floated or grown in a pot

Cons:

  • Invasive in some areas: Don't let it escape into the natural environment
  • Grows best in moderate to high lighting: Though it can survive in low-light environments, it will do better with more light
  • Can be difficult to control: May quickly take over your tank if left unchecked
  • Large root systems can take up a lot of space: The roots of this plant can quickly fill up an empty tank
  • Some fish will eat or shred this plant: Goldfish aren't likely to do much damage, but other fish may decimate this plant

Java Moss

Goldfish love Java moss! This plant is perfect for goldfish tanks because it does not require any special care and can live in a wide range of conditions. Java moss is also a great plant for goldfish because it provides them with a place to hide and feel secure.

Java moss grows actively and fills the aquarium. Goldfish may eat it, but with enough attention, it can grow back quickly. Moss thrives near rocks or snags, as the roots of its plant are stimulated by the roughness. It also minimizes the risk that your fish will remove the roots from beneath the stones. Java moss survives both in cold and warm water aquariums.

Pros:

  • Easy to care: Does not require any special care
  • Provides hiding place: Plant provides a place for goldfish to hide and feel secure
  • Fast-growing: Grows quickly, filling the aquarium
  • Minimizes risk of uprooting fish: The roots of the plant are stimulated by the roughness.
  • Survive in cold and warm water: Can survive in a wide range of conditions

Cons:

  • May be eaten by goldfish: Goldfish may nibble on the plant, which can impede its growth.

Ludwigia

Ludwigia

Ludwigia is a stem plant that comes in a variety of hues, some of which are among the reddest specimens in the aquarium business. The optimum red color is achieved when high lighting and CO2 supplementation combine, while mild to severe lighting without CO2 addition produces somewhat less brilliant crimson color Ludwigia may be propagated by stem cuttings, and it grows to be more than 20 inches tall.

This plant can be grown by beginners with proper lighting. But Its light and CO2 preferences make it better-suited to more advanced aquariums. Ludwigia is a fast grower and may become troublesome in smaller tanks.

Pros:

  • Moderate to rapid growth rate: This plant can easily outgrow.
  • Multiple varieties available: You can find Ludwigia in a variety of colors, including some very vibrant options.
  • Sought after for bright red coloration: Its bright red color is one of its most popular features.
  • Most fish won’t eat this plant: Ludwigia is a tough plant that most fish will leave alone.
  • Easy to propagate: This plant can be easily propagated by stem cuttings.

Cons:

  • Needs high lighting and CO2 supplementation: Without these things, this plant won’t reach its full potential.
  • It May become too large for some tanks: Ludwigia can grow to be more than 20 inches tall.
  • Red color may be dulled: Without high light or CO2, the red color of this plant may be less vibrant.
  • Intermediate growing difficulty: This plant is not the easiest to grow, so it may be better-suited to more experienced hobbyists.
  • May be difficult to keep planted until it roots: Ludwigia has a tendency to float to the surface until it becomes properly rooted.

Bacopa Monnieri

Bacopa Monnieri

Bacopa monnieri, often known as Moneywort, is a magnificent aquatic stem plant that may be cultivated emersed or fully Submerged. It produces small, delicate blooms that provide a touch of color and interest to the aquarium. While most goldfish will ignore Bacopa monnieri, some enjoy the delicate leaves.

It requires substrate for planting and it takes a while for the roots to become firmly established, and it is difficult to uproot before that time. Outside of basic pruning, Bacopa monnieri thrives in medium to high illumination and doesn't require any special attention. It's simple to grow from stem cuttings and may be cultivated in ponds or in tanks.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: It does not require any special attention and can prosper in various lighting conditions.
  • It produces small delicate blooms: The white or blue flowers that it produces are a sight to behold.
  • Can be cultivated emersed or fully submerged: This plant can either be left to grow out of the water or completely submerged.
  • Does not require CO2 supplementation: This plant does not need additional CO2 in order to grow.
  • Rapid growth rate: It can grow up to six inches in length per year.
  • Most fish won’t eat this plant: Goldfish typically do not bother this plant, making it ideal for those who want to avoid having their plants eaten.
  • Easy to propagate: This plant can be easily propagated from stem cuttings.

Cons:

  • Grows best in moderate to high lighting: If you do not provide enough light, this plant will not thrive.
  • Difficult to keep planted until it roots: If the plant is not kept in place, it may float to the top of the tank or pond.
  • May need trimming: If this plant grows too large, it may need to be trimmed.
  • May not do well in murky water: This plant prefers clean water and may not do well if the water is too murky.

Hornwort

Hornwort

The aquatic plant hornwort is quite popular. This plant reaches heights of up to 10 feet within a few months, making it ideal for big tanks and even ponds. It has sharp spines instead of leaves and is generally disliked by fish to consume. It spreads quickly, so even if you have goldfish that are determined on eating it, it will most likely recover before they consume everything.

Hornwort may be grown on a substrate, but it is just as happy floating freely in the water. If you try to plant it and your goldfish keeps uprooting it, just leave it floating; it will continue to grow. You can simply cut the stems to produce more. Hornwort's major disadvantage is that it may shed its spines, particularly in low-light settings, leaving a large mess in your aquarium.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: This plant is very easy to grow and can prosper in various lighting conditions.
  • It spreads quickly: This plant can spread rapidly, making it ideal for those who want to quickly fill up their tank.
  • Most fish won’t eat this plant: Goldfish typically do not bother this plant, making it ideal for those who want to avoid having their plants eaten.
  • Easy to propagate: This plant can be easily propagated from stem cuttings.
  • Does not require CO2 supplementation: This plant does not need additional CO2 in order to grow.
  • Great for tanks or ponds: This plant is perfect for both big tanks and ponds.
  • Doesn’t require substrate: This plant doesn’t need a substrate and can simply float in the water.
  • Most fish won’t eat it: Goldfish don’t tend to bother this plant, making it ideal for those who want to avoid having their plants eaten.

Cons:

  • Will shed spines in low-light environments: If this plant is in a low-light setting, it may shed its spines, leaving a large mess in your aquarium.
  • Can take over a tank: This plant can spread quickly, so it is important to keep an eye on it and make sure it does not take over your tank.
  • It May be too large for small tanks: This plant can reach heights of up to 10 feet, so it may be too large for small tanks.

Anubias

Anubias

Anubias are excellent choices for goldfish tanks since, while they take time to develop, they are unpalatable to most fish. It also doesn't require a substrate, and if the rhizome is completely planted, it'll die like Java fern.

Anubias prefer to grow attached to surfaces since it can be glued or tied to them in your aquarium. It's easy to grow and is readily propagated through rhizome division. It thrives in low-light settings and can even be found growing on damp sidewalks. It develops large, spreading root systems that develop more rapidly than the plant itself and take up a lot of room.

There are numerous various forms of Anubias, which range in height from 2 to 4 inches tall up to over a foot tall. There's an Anubias species for every tank size, because they come in all different sizes. It also implies that you should be aware of the variety of Anubias you're buying in order to guarantee it won't grow too big for your aquarium.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: Anubias is a low-maintenance plant that's easy to take care of.
  • Unpalatable to fish: Anubias are unpalatable to most fish, which makes them an ideal choice for goldfish tanks.
  • Can be glued or tied to surfaces: Anubias can be glued or tied to surfaces, which makes them easy to attach to your aquarium.
  • Low-light tolerant: Anubias can tolerate low-light conditions, making them ideal for goldfish tanks.
  • Doesn’t require substrate: Anubias don’t require a substrate, which makes them easy to care for.
  • Reproduces readily: Anubias reproduce quickly and easily, making them easy to propagate.
  • Multiple varieties available: There are many different varieties of Anubias available, so you can find one that’s right for your tank.
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: Anubias don’t require CO2 supplementation, making them easy to care for.

Cons:

  • Grows slowly: Anubias grow slowly, which means it may take some time for them to reach their full size.
  • Requires pruning: Anubias require periodic pruning to prevent them from taking over the aquarium.
  • Can be difficult to remove: Anubias can be difficult to remove from the aquarium once they’ve established themselves.
  • Rhizomes can be invasive: The rhizomes of Anubias can be invasive, so they should be monitored closely.
  • Large root systems: Anubias have large, spreading root systems that can take up a lot of space in the aquarium.
  • Will die if fully planted: Anubias will die if the rhizome is completely planted, so they should be left partially unplanted.

Aponogeton

Aponogeton

Aponogeton plants are ideal if you're searching for a plant that will grow faster than your goldfish can devour it. Although these plants can survive with very little light, the more intense the lighting, the faster they'll grow.

Some individuals claim that these plants develop several inches in a single night. The growth rate begins to decline as they grow older, but they are typically rather tall at that point. Goldfish are rarely interested in Aponogeton plants, but they are bulb plants, so the hard part is keeping the bulb submerged long enough for it to establish fully in the substrate.

There are many different types of Aponogeton, and some are more picky and difficult to grow than others. The more delicate Madagascar Lace Aponogeton is not as easy to grow for beginners as the popular Aponogeton ulvaceus and bolivianus types.

Pros:

  • Some varieties are easy to grow: Aponogeton ulvaceus and bolivianus are popular for their ease of growth.
  • Rapid to very rapid growth rate: These plants can grow several inches in a single night under the right conditions.
  • Can survive in low-light: These plants can tolerate very low light levels, making them ideal for beginner aquarists.
  • Most fish won’t eat it: Goldfish are not typically interested in eating these plants.
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: Aponogeton plants do not require CO2 injection to prosper.
  • Great for large and tall tanks: Some species of Aponogeton can grow to be very large, making them ideal for tall tanks.

Cons:

  • Some varieties are difficult to grow: The Madagascar Lace Aponogeton is not as easy to grow as some of the other varieties.
  • Grow best in moderate to high lighting: These plants will grow faster under more intense lighting.
  • Bulb plants can be difficult to keep submerged: The bulbs of these plants need to be kept submerged in order for them to establish properly.
  • Difficult to keep the bulb planted until it roots: If the bulb is not planted correctly, it will float to the surface and may not root properly.

Vallisneria

Vallisneria

Vallisneria is a great choice for an open area with a grassy plant that's practically goldfish-proof. Vallisneria comes in a variety of forms, with the largest reaching up to 6 feet tall.

However, it won't grow above the waterline and will float gently across the surface of the water, blocking sunlight to other plants. It's a fantastic low-light plant, but the taller the plant gets when the light is dim because it stretches for more of it. Increased light will cause plants to grow shorter and bushier. It's simple to produce by root division.

This plant is ideal for use in fry tanks because it provides protection and a feeling of security. Vallisneria should not be planted directly in the substrate, and it is easy to uproot before it has had a chance to grow.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: Vallisneria is one of the easiest plants to grow and cultivate.
  • survive in Low light: It can thrive in low-light conditions, making it ideal for dimmer tanks.
  • Great for tanks or ponds: Vallisneria is a versatile plant that can be used in both tanks and ponds.
  • Moderate to rapid growth rate: It has a moderate to rapid growth rate, depending on the conditions in which it is grown.
  • Easy to propagate: It can be easily propagated through root division.
  • Most fish won’t eat it: It is a tough plant that most fish won’t bother nibbling on.
  • Multiple varieties available: There are many varieties of Vallisneria available, each with its own unique look.
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: It does not require CO2 supplementation to thrive.

Cons:

  • Grows best in moderate to high lighting: Vallisneria does best in moderate to high lighting.
  • May uproot easily: It may uproot easily if not planted securely in the substrate.
  • Block lighting to lower plants in the tank: Its large leaves may block lighting to lower plants in the tank.

Vallisneria

Myriophyllum

Myriophyllum is a stem plant with numerous varieties that comes in red and green hues. The Monstera plant, which grows at a fast rate and is easy to propagate via stem cuttings, thrives in both tanks and ponds.

However, some types of Myriophyllum, including Parrot's Feather, are invasive and should not be released into the natural environment. Above ground, Myriophyllum may reach 2 feet tall and grow bushy bunches of spines instead of leaves.

This is an excellent plant for fry tanks. It will grow well in low light, but it will flourish under high lighting the most. Its finest color is under high lighting.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: This plant is easy to grow, whether in an aquarium or pond.
  • Flexible: The plant can do well in both low and high lighting conditions.
  • Attractive: Available in many color varieties
  • Fantastic for fry tanks and small goldfish: The plant's small size makes it perfect for fry tanks and smaller ponds. It also provides valuable cover for fry.
  • Rapid growth rate: This plant grows quickly, making it ideal for filling in gaps in the aquarium or pond.
  • Does not require CO2 supplementation: This plant does not need CO2 to grow, making it a great choice for beginner aquarists.
  • Most fish won’t eat this plant: Many fish won’t eat this plant, making it a good choice for those who are concerned about their fish nibbling on their plants.
  • Delicate bunches of spines instead of leaves: The plant's spines are delicate and do not pose a threat to fish.

Cons:

  • Invasive in some areas: Some varieties of Myriophyllum are considered invasive, so be sure to research before planting.
  • May uproot other plants: The plant's roots are vigorous and may uproot other plants in the aquarium or pond.
  • Grows best under high lighting: The plant grows best under high lighting, which may not be ideal for all setups.
  • Best coloration under high lighting: The plant's colors are most vibrant under high lighting, which may not be ideal for all setups.

Water Wisteria

Water Wisteria

Water wisteria is unique in that it can alter its leaf shape based on the amount of light it receives and how far it is from the light source. Water wisteria plants in the bottom of the tank will have larger leaves than floating water wisteria because they are exposed to more light.

It may be grown in water or planted in the substrate, though it prefers to be grown in the substrate. It has a fast rate of development, but it seldom grows for the first few weeks in a new setting. When it comes to tank set-up, be wary that it may melt leaves when moved from one aquarium to the next. It propagates easily from a single leaf, as water sprite does, but stem cuttings are most effective at producing new plants.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: This plant is very easy to grow, making it a great choice for beginner goldfish keepers.
  • Fast growth rate: Water wisteria grows quickly, which can help to combat algae growth in the aquarium.
  • Alters leaf shape: This plant is unique in that it alters its leaf shape based on the amount of light it receives.
  • Propagates easily: Water wisteria can be propagated easily from a single leaf or stem cutting.
  • Doesn’t require CO2 supplementation: This plant does not require CO2 supplementation, making it a good choice for those who do not want to invest in a CO2 system.
  • Can be planted or floated: This plant can be either planted in the substrate or floated, making it a versatile addition to the aquarium.

Cons:

  • Grows best in moderate to high lighting: This plant requires moderate to high lighting in order to grow well. If the lighting is not adequate, the plant will not thrive.
  • May melt when moved: Water wisteria may melt when it is moved from one aquarium to another. This can be a problem when trying to Propagate the plant.
  • May need trimming: Water wisteria can grow quickly and may need to be trimmed periodically to prevent it from taking over the aquarium.
  • Grows best in substrate: Water wisteria prefers to be grown in the substrate, rather than floated. This can be a problem for those who do not want to plant their aquarium.
  • Some fish will eat or shred this plant: Goldfish are not known to eat or shred this plant, but some other fish, such as barbs, may do so.
  • Large roots take up a lot of space: This can be a problem for those who have limited space in their aquarium.

Pothos

Pothos

Pothos is tough, easy to cultivate, and thrives in water, making it an unexpected but ideal plant for your goldfish tank. This plant will thrive in your aquarium, absorbing nitrates from the water and growing just as well as it would in a pot.

Pothos vines may be allowed to dangle, creep, or climb as they grow, giving you more control over what to do with the vines. The roots of the plant are not harmful to goldfish, and they are unlikely to eat them or damage the entire plant. Pothos plants require pruning to prevent leggy vines and do not like being chilled.

Pros:

  • Easy to grow: Pothos is an adaptable plant that can grow in a wide range of conditions, making it ideal for beginner gardeners.
  • Absorbs nitrates effectively: Pothos is known for its ability to absorb nitrates from the water, making it a great plant for goldfish tanks.
  • Goldfish are unlikely to eat the roots: The roots of pothos plants are not harmful to goldfish, and they are unlikely to eat them or damage the entire plant.
  • Can hang, creep, or climb: Pothos vines can be allowed to dangle, creep, or climb as they grow, giving you more control over what to do with the vines.

Cons:

  • Cannot be submerged: Pothos cannot grow entirely submerged in water, so it is not suitable for tanks with goldfish that like to dig.
  • Require routine pruning: Pothos plants require pruning to prevent leggy vines.
  • Don't like being chilled: Pothos plants do not like being chilled, so they should be kept in warm tanks.
  • Should not be exposed to drafts: Pothos plants should not be exposed to drafts, as this can damage the leaves.
  • Grows best in moderate to high lighting: Pothos plants grow best in moderate to high lighting, so they may not do well in low-light tanks.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily

Another terrestrial plant that may be cultivated in your goldfish tank's water is Peace lilies, which have roots that may be immersed. Peace lilies are excellent at removing nitrates from your tank while goldfish are unlikely to harm the plant's roots.

These plants are not suited for underwater culture and should not be grown indoors with cats or dogs, as the blooms can be extremely toxic. The flowers and leaves, on the other hand, are lovely. Some cultivars of peace lily can grow up to 6 feet tall, despite the fact that most do not exceed 18-24 inches in height. Although they may develop in low light, they do best in bright, indirect illumination.

Pros:

  • Absorbs nitrates effectively: This plant improves water quality by helping to remove nitrates from the water.
  • Goldfish are unlikely to eat the roots: The roots of this plant are not as tasty to goldfish as some other plants, making it a good option if you're worried about your fish nibbling on the roots.
  • Attractive flowers and foliage: The blooms of this plant are lovely, and the leaves are also attractive.
  • Most varieties won’t exceed 24 inches in height: This plant is a good option if you're looking for a tall plant that won't take over your tank.

Cons:

  • Intermediate growing difficulty: This plant is not as easy to care for as some other options, so it may not be the best choice for beginners.
  • Toxic to cats and dogs: The blooms of this plant are toxic to cats and dogs, so it's not a good option if you have either of these animals.
  • Grows best in bright, indirect light: It needs more light than some other aquatic plants, so it may not be a good choice if your tank is in a low-light area.
  • Require high humidity: This plant requires high humidity, so it's not a good choice if you live in a dry climate.

Duckweed

Duckweed is a wonderful addition to a goldfish tank since goldfish are one of the few fish that can keep this voracious grower under control. Duckweed can mature at a rate of two times in as little as 24 hours, allowing it to dominate your aquarium in no time. This floating plant is almost impossible to remove from the tank, no matter how much you take away. Duckweed may be used in fish food preparations at home, as well.

Pros:

  • Goldfish will keep this plant under control: it can mature at a rate of two times in as little as 24 hours, allowing it to dominate your aquarium in no time.
  • Can survive in low-light environments: since it's a floating plant, it doesn't need to be near the light source in order to photosynthesize.

Cons:

  • Extremely rapid growth rate: If you don't want your goldfish tank to be taken over by duckweed, you'll need to remove it frequently.
  • May block out the light: if the duckweed population in your goldfish tank gets out of control, it may block out the light, making it difficult for other plants to grow.

Crypts

Crypts and goldfish are a match made in heaven. They prefer to live in gravel or sand. The plant needs ample iron and nitrogen to grow. However, as the plant matures, it develops a massive root system that can resist pulling by the fish. The nicest aspect about crypts is that they don't require a lot of light.

New crypt plants' leaves frequently appear to be "melting." Although it appears that the leaves are dead, they will generally return looking lush and robust.

Pros:

  • They don't require a lot of light: If you have floating plants, they'll thrive in shaded spots and will produce towering jungles in low light.
  • It has a massive root system: This will prevent your goldfish from uprooting them.

Cons:

  • Difficult to find crypts that are tolerant of goldfish: Some varieties will quickly succumb to their grazing.
  • Need iron and nitrogen to grow: You may need to supplement these inorder for your crypts to do well.

Amazon Sword

Amazon Sword

The Amazon Sword is well-known for its big leaves, which would beautify any aquarium. The name is derived from the Amazon River's diverse ecosystem, which is where it originated.

The Amazon Sword thrives in a wide range of temperatures. It can either be entirely or partially immersed in water, and it generally grows to 24 inches long. The Amazon Sword leaves will be nibbled on by the goldfish, but the plant continuously grows new leaves to keep up with the damage. If your fish are well fed, they will not damage the plants to any significant extent.

It requires a substrate that is at least 2.5 inches thick, and it should be placed in the middle of the aquarium. Your goldfish will appreciate the Amazon Sword's surrounding greenery as it matures into a thickly wooded jungle where they may hide. The plant can withstand a PH of 6.5 to 7.5. You may remove undesirable shoots when it begins to spread across your aquarium or while propagation.

Pros:

  • It has beautiful big leaves: The Amazon Sword's large leaves are one of its most defining characteristics. They are wide and shield-like, adding a touch of elegance to any aquarium
  • Easy to care for: The Amazon Sword is a low-maintenance plant that can withstand a wide range of conditions.
  • Not picky about its substrate: As long as it is at least 2.5 inches thick, the Amazon Sword will be happy with any type of substrate.
  • Provides hiding places: The Amazon Sword's leaves create a thick canopy, providing your goldfish with plenty of places to hide.

Cons:

  • It is susceptible to poor water quality: The Amazon Sword requires frequent water changes in order to stay healthy.
  • It can spread quickly: The Amazon Sword can spread rapidly, so you will need to remove unwanted shoots on a regular basis.
  • It may be nibbled on by goldfish: The Amazon Sword's leaves are a tasty treat for goldfish. If your fish are not well-fed, they may damage the plant in their quest for food.

Marimo Moss Ball

Marimo Moss Ball

Another fantastic choice for goldfish tanks is the Marimo Moss Ball, often referred to as a moss ball. They appear as squishy balls of algae that look like moss. Their circular form is derived from rolling along the bottoms of lakes in their natural habitats. They are commonly kept as family heirlooms in Japan since they can live 200 years.

Moss balls filter out nitrates, ammonia, and fish waste in tiny amounts. Since the plants get their nourishment from similar sources like algae, they will not develop invasive algal growth in your aquarium. Moss plants also harbor a healthy population of beneficial bacteria that aid the nitrogen cycle.

Moss balls only require a little bit of light and freshwater to survive. However, if you leave the balls alone for long periods of time, they will accumulate debris and need to be squeezed out.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for: does not require intense lighting or fertilization
  • Can help control algae growth: This plant competes with algae for nutrients
  • Improves water quality: helps to filter out toxins and waste products
  • Long-lived: with proper care, can live up to 200 years
  • Traps fish waste and debris: will help keep your aquarium clean

Cons:

  • Not a very decorative plant: some find them unattractive
  • Can become covered in debris: if not cleaned regularly, moss balls can become a breeding ground for harmful bacteria.

Vallisneria Spiralis

Vallisneria Spiralis

Vallisneria is a type of aquatic plant that looks like a lawn but has larger, thicker leaves than grass and can grow up to 30 inches tall. Some aquarium owners may not like the fact that Vallisneria spiralis must be cut every few weeks. You should cut the grass less often if you feed your fish with these leaves because they like them.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for: It is an easy plant to take care of and can thrive in many different types of aquariums.
  • create a natural environment: Vallisneria can help create a more natural environment for your fish.
  • Fish can consume: Vallisneria is not only a good-looking plant but fish can consume it which helps with their diet.
  • Improves water quality: Vallisneria can also help to keep the water quality in your aquarium clean by absorbing toxins.

Cons:

  • Can uproot easily: Vallisneria can uproot easily if the fish in your aquarium dig around or if there is a lot of movement in the water.
  • Can take over the aquarium: Vallisneria can also take over an aquarium if not trimmed often enough.
  • May need CO2: Vallisneria may need CO2 in order to thrive.

Wisteria

Wisteria

The roots of this aquarium plant grow in the substrate. Wisteria's roots quickly form a substantial root network. The growth rate may reach 2 inches each week, making up for the goldfish's nibbles.

It's simple to maintain, low-maintenance, and forgiving of first-time errors. When the plant is in the middle of the tank, it looks its best. The addition of a high-iron fertilizer for the tank and a CO2 general substrate fertilizer is required for this plant to grow. You should provide enough lighting to ensure that your plant is adequately illuminated. It flourishes in a pH range of 6.5 to 7.5

Pros:

  • Grows quickly: This is an ideal plant for a goldfish tank because it can outgrow the fish's nibbling.
  • Forgiving of first-time errors: Wisteria is a low-maintenance plant, which makes it ideal for those who are new to keeping aquarium plants.
  • Low-maintenance: This plant does not require much in the way of care, making it ideal for those who do not want to spend a lot of time caring for their goldfish tank

Cons:

  • May outgrow the goldfish tank: Wisteria can grow quite quickly, so it is important to make sure that it does not outgrow the goldfish tank.
  • Requires high-iron fertilizer: This plant requires a high-iron fertilizer in order to thrive, so it is important to make sure that you have the right fertilizer for the tank.
  • Needs adequate lighting: Wisteria needs adequate lighting in order to grow properly, so it is important to make sure that the tank is well-lit.

Water Lettuce

Water Lettuce

Because this plant grows rapidly, you must keep an eye on it. Water lettuce is a floating plant that may reach up to 5 inches in diameter in just a few days. Water lettuce absorbs a lot of oxygen and blocks a significant amount of light.

Water lettuce grows in tropical and subtropical reservoirs, ponds, sluggish streams, and lakes. The plant is extremely resilient in the wild, and it has been observed living in temperatures as low as 39°F. Water lettuce is a popular aquarium plant due to its low-maintenance nature. Water lettuce has a wide range of sizes, with the typical length being 6 inches but reaching up to 20 inches in width.

The plant grows fast and may cover the entire surface of an aquarium in a few months.

Pros:

  • Grows rapidly: Water lettuce can double in size every week, so it's great for quickly filling up an aquarium.
  • Floating plant: Water lettuce provides valuable surface area for goldfish to rest on and lay their eggs.
  • Low-maintenance: Water lettuce is very easy to care for and doesn't require much attention.
  • Can survive in a wide range of temperatures: Water lettuce is a very hardy plant and can withstand a wide range of temperatures, making it a good choice for beginner aquarists.

Cons:

  • Grows too rapidly: Water lettuce can quickly take over an aquarium, so you must keep an eye on it.
  • Blocks light: Water lettuce blocks a significant amount of light, so it's not a good plant for low-light aquariums.
  • May overcrowd an aquarium: Water lettuce can quickly fill up an aquarium, so you may need to remove some of the plants if they start to crowd the tank.

Anacharis

Anacharis

Anacharis, which is also known as Brazilian Water Weed, is one of the finest plants to add oxygen to your goldfish tank.

The uniqueness of this plant is that all goldfish like to consume it. This plant grows fast, but the goldfish leaves consumed do not allow for enough expansion. However, you won't have to trim the extra leaves of this aquarium plant as often as other plants. Anacharis is a low-maintenance plant that grows rapidly in the tank and may need trimming or pruning if it begins to dominate! When grown in direct light, it grows rapidly, so moderate light levels are best for controlling growth.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for: Anacharis is very easy to care for plant that is perfect for beginners.
  • Fast grower: It can help to oxygenate your tank and provide hiding places for your fish.
  • Hardy: It is extremely hardy and can withstand large swings in temperature.
  • Provides goldfish with food: All goldfish love to eat Anacharis, so it's a great way to provide them with some extra nutrition.
  • Good for oxygenation: Anacharis is great for oxygenating your tank and can help to improve water quality.

Cons:

  • Grows too quickly: Anacharis can grow too quickly for some tanks, taking over the space and crowding out other plants.
  • Needs supplemental substrate fertilizer and additional Co2: In warm water aquariums, Anacharis will need supplemental substrate fertilizer and additional Co2 in order to thrive.

Apart from the above mentioned plants, there are many other not so popular plants suitable for goldfish tanks. They are:

Crinum calamistratum

The giant scallion is a bulb plant with crinkly leaves that can grow up to 4 feet (1.2 m) in length. It thrives in harder water and enjoys a higher pH level just like goldfish. Because the plant is so robust and thick, it is not damaged by goldfish bumping or chewing on the leaves.

Bolbitis Fern

This aquatic plant, also known as the African water fern, has textured, emerald green leaves that are not seen in other aquatic plants. It thrives in water with a higher pH and hardness. The Bolbitis fern, like anubias and java fern, likes to be attached to hardscape or aquarium décor so that its rhizome is not buried. If you have low to medium lighting and some liquid fertilizer on hand, you may develop into an amazing bush.

Elodea 

These are excellent for goldfish tanks and provides further nutrition. Elodea is a favorite food of goldfish. There's no doubting it, but these plants generally develop quicker than the goldfish can consume them. Elodea Crispa or Elodea Canadensis are the two most common species of Elodea found in pet stores.

What Kind of Plants Do Goldfish Like

FAQ: 

Do Goldfish Like Plants in the Tank? 

Goldfish are omnivorous creatures that enjoy a varied diet. This includes both meat and plant-based foods. Goldfish will often graze on the plants in their tank, which helps to keep them healthy and provides them with essential nutrients. Plants also help to create a natural environment for goldfish to swim and explore. So, Yes!! Goldfish do like plants in the tank.

Do Goldfish Need Plants in Their Tank?

It is not necessary for Goldfish to have plants in their aquarium, but they may benefit from them because they contribute to the creation of a healthy ecosystem by reducing nitrates and providing oxygen. Plants also provide Goldfish with a place to hide and feel secure.

Keeping plants in the aquarium is a fantastic method to duplicate their natural environment and generate an ecosystem, as well.

Why Goldfish Eat Plants?

Goldfish are omnivores that, in their natural habitat, consume aquatic plants, frogs, fish eggs, insects, and larvae.

Goldfish are omnivores that require a variety of vegetarian foods, but some high-end Goldfish need a decent amount of vegetarian food or else they will develop intestinal issues.

What Are the Benefits of Having a Live Plant in the Goldfish Aquarium?

Some of the benefits of having live plants in a goldfish aquarium are:

  • It promotes the health of your aquarium by increasing the amount of oxygen. It also lowers carbon dioxide and ammonia levels, which are produced by your Goldfish.
  • Create an ecosystem in your aquarium that benefits Goldfish by reducing their stress and improving their health.
  • For them, live plants are an excellent vegetarian diet.
  • They give your aquarium a nice appearance.
  • Plants also provide Goldfish a place to hide. Goldfish like to sleep next to plants.

Do Goldfish Eat Duckweed and Frogbit Plants?

Duckweed thrives at a rapid rate and can quickly overrun an aquarium. It's a great way to add color, beauty, and nutrients to your aquatic ecosystem. Goldfish love to graze on it. Goldfish will also consume frogbit plants in your aquarium. Both of these species are great for adding to the health of your goldfish's diet.

How to Secure Plants in a Goldfish Tank? 

Plants that don't require a substrate, such as Anubias, can be planted on rocks, driftwood, and other decorations. A fishing line or thread may also be used to attach the plants. Some pet shops will also have aquarium glue to attach the rhizomes and secure the plant. You may then arrange the stones in the middle or background of your aquarium, depending on your preference.

For plants that need a substrate, you can use gravel, sand, or even mud. Be sure to rinse the substrate thoroughly before adding it to your tank.

Do Goldfish Like Fake Plants? 

While some goldfish may nibble on fake plants, they generally prefer the real thing. Fake plants can also harbor bacteria and other harmful chemicals that can harm your fish. If you choose to use fake plants in your aquarium, be sure to inspect them regularly and replace them as needed.

Do Goldfish Like a Lot of Plants?

While goldfish may not necessarily like a lot of plants, they do benefit from having them in their tank. Plants help to create a healthy environment for goldfish to swim and explore. They also provide goldfish with essential nutrients and a place to hide. Too many plants will restrict the goldfish's swimming space. So overcrowding the tank with plants is not recommended.

Do Goldfish Eat Anubias? 

Goldfish are generally unable to consume Anubias plants, allowing them to live for a long time in your Goldfish aquarium.

Which Are the Plants Toxic to Goldfish? 

Some of the plants that are toxic to goldfish include; Azaleas, Lily of the valley, Oleander Blue-green and Algae. These can all be harmful if ingested by your goldfish. It is best to avoid these plants altogether if you have goldfish in your aquarium.

What Are Carpet Plants for Goldfish?

Carpet plants are low-growing plants that spread across the bottom of your aquarium. They help to create a naturalistic look in your tank and can also provide a place for your goldfish to graze.

Elatine hydropiper is a rare planted aquarium carpeting plant. This species has tiny foliage, making it ideal for nano aquariums! Elatine hydropiper, like most carpeting plants, thrives in bright light and constant CO2 conditions.

Final Thoughts

Goldfish are a popular type of fish to keep in an aquarium. They are relatively easy to care for and can live for a long time. Goldfish also benefit from having live plants in their tank. Goldfish Plants help to create a healthy environment for goldfish to swim and explore.

They also provide goldfish with essential nutrients and a place to hide. Too much plants will restrict the goldfish's swimming space. So overcrowding the tank with plants is not recommended. Do some research on the best plants for your goldfish aquarium and create a beautiful and healthy environment for your fish!

Sarah Robertson


I am a passionate blogger who also happens to be a fish keeping enthusiast. Writing about my hobby is something that I absolutely love to do, and it's no secret that my chosen topic is always centered around fish keeping.

Sarah Robertson

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